The UQ Poche Centre facilitates a range of research opportunities for undergraduate, honours and masters by coursework students through the UQ Summer Research Program.

The Centre brings together Indigenous and health expertise across the University, and works collaboratively with Indigenous community organisations and health providers. A core objective of the Centre is the development of a skilled, culturally responsive health workforce.

The UQ Summer Research Program provides you with an opportunity to gain research experience working alongside some of the university’s leading academics and researchers and is coordinated by the UQ Student Employability Centre. All Summer Research scholars are eligible to apply for a scholarship for the duration of their research (between 6-10 weeks). 

Broad requirements for the Poche Centre Summer Research Scholarships

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are especially encouraged to apply.
  • Students must be currently enrolled at UQ at the time of application.
  • Students must be studying for a degree relevent to the research discipline.
  • Students must have a high level of academic achievement.

Further information for applicants is available on the UQ Student Employability Centre website.

Applications for 2017 are now open.

Apply now

Applications for 2017 will close on August 31.

It is expected that scholars will work a minimum of 20 hours per week in each week of the research program. Please note that some positions require scholars to work on a full-time basis (up to 36 hours per week), and the expected workload is set by each supervisor. The scholar and the supervisor are able to negotiate the duration of the project and the workload requirements. 

A list of available Poche Centre projects are available below. 

Indigenous young people: Health and identity

Project title: Indigenous young people: Health and identity
Project duration: 10 weeks, with expectation of a minimum of 20 hr/week 
Preferred commencement date: 20 November 2017 (or up to 2 weeks prior to or following start date)
Background:

Led by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research team this project aims to address the knowledge gap in our understandings of identity and  health through privileging Indigenous knowledge and experience.

The proposed project will critically examine existing literature relating to identity formation and development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people.

The successful applicant will support the undertaking of a literature review and publication.

Expected outcomes & deliverables: 

The scholar will further their skills in analysis and writing for publication. The supervisor will provide mentorship and support in developing a work for publication.

Poche summer research scholars may be invited to present their findings and/or experiences at the conclusion of their project.

Suitable for: 3rd and 4th year students in Education, Health Sciences, Humanities & Social Sciences preferably with understanding of and/or experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Primary supervisor: Dr Chelsea Bond
Further information:

Prospective scholars may wish to contact Dr Chelsea Bond for further details.

Watchful waiting for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children with acute otitis media (WATCH) trial

Project title:

Watchful waiting for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children with acute otitis media (WATCH) trial

Project duration: 10 weeks, with expectation of a minimum of 20 hr/week 
Preferred commencement date: 20 November 2017 (or up to 2 weeks prior to or following start date)
Background:

Watchful waiting for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with acute otitis media (WATCH) trial is a randomised control trial which aims to investigate appropriate treatment strategies for ear infections in Indigenous children in metropolitan areas to decrease their risk of developing chronic complications.

As part of this study, the research team are examining how carers, Aboriginal Health Workers, GPs, NPs, researchers and others feel about the  treatment of AOM, and undertaking/participating in research within a primary health care setting.

The successful applicant will carry out tasks relating to the analysis of the transcribed qualitative interviews.

Expected outcomes & deliverables: 

The successful applicant will:

  • Develop a skillset in qualitative data analysis
  • Gain competency in the use of NVivo software (no prior experience necessary)
  • Contribute to a study that will provide an evidence base for treatment of AOM in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in cities

Scholars may be invited to present their findings and/or experiences at the conclusion of their project.

Suitable for:

This project welcomes applications from UQ students with an interest in Indigenous health and a background in Health Sciences, Social Sciences or a related field, preferably with an understanding of and/or experience working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Primary supervisor: Dr Chelsea Bond
Further information:

Prospective scholars may wish to contact Dr Chelsea Bond for further details.

Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting Study

Project title:                 

Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting (IBUS) Study

            
Project duration: 6 - 10 weeks, with expectation of a minimum of 20 hr/week 
Preferred commencement date: 20 November 2017 (or up to 2 weeks prior to or following start date)
Background: The IBUS Study is evaluating best practice maternity care to improve maternal and infant health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in South East Queensland. We are interested in understanding how Birthing on Country principles can best be implemented into maternity services in an urban setting. This study is done in partnership between the Mater Mothers Hospital, the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service. We conduct surveys at 4 time points with women having Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies at the Mater Mothers Hospital and also at the Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospitals. So far we have over 200 women in the study, with almost 500 surveys completed. 


The successful applicant will be trained in research methods to undertake data collection alongside the IBUS Research Assistants. 

            
Expected outcomes & deliverables: 

The student may gain skills on how to obtain informed consent, recruit women, conduct surveys, assist with infant developmental assessments as well as liaise with staff from different models of maternity care, Aboriginal Medical Services, and community based programs. They will gain experience working in a multidisciplinary multiagency partnership, through a study that uses collaborative action-based research to make positive change in service delivery and planning.

Suitable for:                 

This would suit students with backgrounds including but not limited to Midwifery, Nursing, Social Work, Community Services, Medicine, Public Health, Social Science and Indigenous Studies.

Primary supervisor: Dr Sophie Hickey and Prof Sue Kildea
Further information:                 

Prospective scholars may wish to contact Dr Sophie Hickey for further details.

            

Sport-for-development in Indigenous communities - Australia and Canada

Project title: 

Sport-for-development in Indigenous communities - Australia and Canada

Project duration:

10 weeks, with a minimum of 20 hrs/wk

Preferred commencement date:

20 November 2017 (or up to 2 weeks prior to or following start date).

Description:

This project is part of a large international project that is a collaboration between scholars in Australia and Canada, as well as a variety of individuals, communities, and organisations associated with the extractives sector, sport, and education. The project is examining the variety of perspectives related to the place of sport in Indigenous communities and the role of extractives companies (mineral, oil, gas mining etc) in supporting sport. Scholarship winners may be involved in a variety of activities included (but not limited to) sourcing and reviewing social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and literature sources (e.g. annual reports, journal articles), collaborating with domestic and international scholars, developing and presenting review documents, and other related work.

Expected outcomes and deliverables:

Successful scholars may gain skills in social media review and analysis, literature review and analysis, collaborating with peers and academic personnel, as well as aspects of project management. Scholars will be supported in developing and presenting their work.

Suitable for:

This project is open to applications from students with an interest (and preferably a background) in sport and/or Indigenous studies. Students should be approaching the final semesters of their program.

Primary Supervisor:

 

Dr Steven Rynne (with other domestic and international collaborators)

Further info:

Prospective applicants may wish to contact Dr Steven Rynne for further information / clarification.

 

Strengthening the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce: Leadership in Research

Project title:

Strengthening the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce: Leadership in Research

Project duration:

6 - 10 weeks, with expectation of a minimum of 20 hr/week 

Preferred commencement date:

20 November 2017 (or up to 2 weeks prior to or following start date)

Background:

The UQ Poche Centre for Indigenous Health is committed to supporting leadership in urban Indigenous health research and workforce development. Fundamental is Indigenous leadership in shaping research agendas, ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities benefit from research, and foregrounding and respecting Indigenous knowledges.. This Summer Research project offers the student the opportunity to be involved in work focused on improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. .

This Summer Research project offers the student the opportunity to be involved in the development of strategies that lead to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Expected outcomes & deliverables: 

The successful applicant will have the opportunity to be involved in the research work of the UQ Poche Centre and be exposed to broad range of research activities. 

Key tasks may include:

  • Conduct a literature search
  • Assist with grant and ethics applications
  • Assist with the analysis of transcripts
  • Report writing
  • Contribute to database development
  • Otherwise assist on research projects or tasks.

Poche summer research scholars may be invited to present their findings and/or experiences at the conclusion of their project.

Suitable for:

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students in the health faculties.

Primary supervisor:

Dr Chelsea Bond and Dr Bryan Mukandi

Further information:

Prospective scholars may wish to contact Dr Chelsea Bond for further details.

Other - Student-suggested projects

Students also have the option to suggest their own research project. In order to apply for the Summer Research Program, you will need to provide the following:

  • Proposed supervisor
  • Proposed project title
  • Proposed duration and start date
  • Summary of proposed research including background, aim, activities and methods
  • Expected outcomes and deliverables of your participation in the Program

The Poche Centre is able to assist in this process. If you would like to discuss, please contact Rachel Bastin (Operations Manager) at poche@uq.edu.au.

Jordan Cory
As part of her Summer Research Project, Jordan evaluated and redeveloped a tool for occupational and speech therapists working with Indigenous school children on a range of difficulties that make learning or school participation challenging.